Homemade Apricot Syrup

homemade apricot syrupWhen life gives you apricots, make syrup! I started making apricot syrup almost out of desperation. One year, in my enthusiasm for all things fresh and sweet, I purchased 40 pounds of fresh apricots. Yeah. It’s a lot. Plus the temperature was in triple digits so I wasn’t going to be able to let them sit on the counter for very long. So I canned apricot halves and apricot jam. Made apricot leather and dried apricot pieces. Ate lots and lots of fresh apricots. And still had plenty of apricots, so I made syrup. It’s been a family favorite ever since, perfect for topping pancakes, waffles, and ice cream.

This recipe was originally posted on my other blog. You can find additional photos there.

Recipe:

1. Wash apricots (about 3 lbs), cut into quarters and throw away the pits. There is no need to peel the apricots, although you can if you wish.

2. In a large Dutch oven, cook the apricots in a little water until they are soft, then puree using a blender or food processor.

3. Measure the puree (I had 6 cups of puree) and then put it back in the Dutch oven. Add an equal amount of sugar and about 1/4 cup of lemon juice. The lemon juice keeps the apricots nice and bright but you can leave it out. The cooked syrup will be a darker brown color, but will still taste great!

4. Stir the sugar/apricot mixture until the sugar melts, but first……TIP (this will save you much frustration and mess) take a stick of butter and just rub it along the inside lip of the Dutch oven. The butter fat will keep the syrup from boiling over. This is the voice of experience, apricot syrup all over the stove, floor, etc. is a sticky mess.

5. Bring the mixture to a boil, and stir often until it reaches 215 – 218 degrees (use a candy thermometer).

6. Remove the mixture from heat, stir and skim off the foam if there is any. Pour into 1/2 or 1 pint jars (I used 3/4 pint jars here, but they aren’t always easy to find). Leave about 1/2 inch of headroom.

7.  Wipe the jar rims with a moistened paper towel and put on the two-piece lids.

8. Bring water to a boil in a water bath canner, add the syrup jars (using the little basket that keeps the jars off the bottom of the canner), make sure that they are covered with 1-2 inches of water and bring back to a boil. Reduce heat somewhat (you still want it to be boiling though) and process for 10 minutes.

9. Remove the jars and set on a towel on the counter top to cool. There, you have made delicious syrup perfect for pancakes or biscuits all winter long.

Some additional tips: The 6 cups of puree made about 4 pints of syrup.  You can also use this same basic recipe to make raspberry, strawberry, blueberry, cherry or grape syrup. Don’t reduce the amount of sugar as the recipe won’t work. For lower sugar syrup look for an approved reduced sugar jam recipe (ask your local extension agent) and cook until it is just short of  setting. Syrup is basically runny jam!

by Renee Pottle

Renee Pottle, a freelance writer and Home Economist, is fanatic about all things food. She blogs about canning and food preservation at SeedToPantry.com. Find her professional food writing info at PenandProvisions.com.

June 25, 2013

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8 Comments

  1. Barbara Fuhs

    Can I use peaches instead of apricots, can’t find apricots

    Reply
    • admin

      Barbara, absolutely! You can use any fruit. I have made raspberry-peach syrup, strawberry syrup, and apple-pear syrup. You will have to peel the peaches first, unlike apricots. It will be delicious.

      Reply
  2. lisa

    If I have a good blender, do i need to cook them first?

    Reply
    • admin

      Lisa, if the apricots are very ripe, you probably don’t have to cook them first. If you have any that are a little under-ripe though, it’s probably best to cook them. You could always “cook” them in the microwave to save time.

      Renee

      Reply
  3. Sonia

    I was going to make apricot leather, so I puréed my apricots in the Vita Mix, but then I saw your recipe. Can I heat the purée and then continue the other steps?

    Reply
    • admin

      Absolutely Sonia! It should work perfectly.

      Reply
  4. Brandon Smith

    How much is “a little water” in step 2?

    Reply
    • admin

      Brandon, just enough to keep the apricots from sticking to the pot and burning.
      Renee

      Reply

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